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Earn More with Interest-Bearing Checking Accounts


An interest-bearing checking account offers the interest accumulation of savings accounts with the withdrawal and check-writing ease of checking accounts. This best-of-both-worlds combination allows bank customers to accrue some interest on their balance while only needing to meet some minimum requirements.

Interest Bearing Checking Accounts

First Bank’s Interest-Bearing Checking Accounts

The money in your checking account is yours and earning interest on it matters. At First Bank, we offer three types of checking accounts (two personal and one business) that accrue interest when the minimum balance is maintained. Each is uniquely designed to meet the needs of our many different customers.

Interest-Bearing Personal Checking Accounts

  • Everywhere Plus. Our Everywhere Plus account comes with free online and mobile banking, free online bill pay, and free paper or electronic statements. Everywhere Plus customers also enjoy use of CashPoints® ATMs free of any First Bank fees and a debit/credit card rewards program for registered users.
  • Everywhere Premium. The Everywhere Premium account includes all the basics of the Everywhere Plus level while also granting unlimited out-of-network ATM transactions with no First Bank fees, free member checks or 50% off other check designs, and four free official checks per statement cycle.

Interest-Bearing Checking Account for Businesses

With our Business Interest account, business owners enjoy:

  • 250 free transactions per month
  • Cash or coin deposits of up to $10,000 every month at no charge
  • Rewards benefits with a registered credit or debit card
  • Free 24-hour telephone banking
  • Online and mobile banking

Contact your local branch and get started with an interest-bearing checking account today.

Is an Interest-Bearing Account Right for Me?

According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, interest-earning checking accounts are typically good for people who:

  • Carry large account balances
  • Spend less than they earn
  • Keep a stockpile of cash or funds
  • Are retired and want a higher-interest product than most of today’s investment accounts
  • Pay attention to their finances and can meet the criteria needed to open an interest-earning checking account

For a related article, visit: High Interest Checking Accounts – North Carolina


While First Bank does not charge for mobile banking, your mobile carrier’s message and data rates may apply. The First Bank Digital Banking Apps are available for select mobile and tablet devices. There is no charge from First Bank, but message and data rates may apply. Must enroll in First Bank Online Banking and download the First Bank Digital Banking App from the App Store or Google Play. Apple, the Apple logo, and iPhone are trademarks of Apple, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple, Inc. Android and Google Play are trademarks of Google Inc. Free ATM network includes First Bank and CashPoints® terminals. Out of network terminal owners may charge a service fee. Eligible personal deposits include checking, savings, Money Market, CD, or IRA. Eligible personal loans do not include residential mortgage loans. See our Terms and Conditions for complete details on our One Rewards Program. Loans subject to credit approval. A transaction is defined as any checks paid, deposits, each deposited item, ATM withdrawals, debit card transactions, online and telephone funds transfers, and ACH debits and credits. Nominal fee of $0.15 per $100 of all excess deposits and for all coin and currency delivered.

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Sources:

Las Vegas Review-Journal: http://www.reviewjournal.com/business/money/here-s-why-earning-interest-your-checking-account-matters

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